Brianna McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Multidisciplinary artist
info@womenandtheirwork.orgwomenandtheirwork.org
Brianna McIntyre

Brianna

McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Continuity Chair

2017, Mixed media, steam bent ash, paracord, 28 x 30 x 28 in

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Brianna

McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Parable of the Invisible Maiden

2017, Fabric, wire, burlap, pinewood, boxes, Dimensions variable

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Brianna

McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Phase Shelf

2019, Ash veneer, 12 x 12 x 8 in

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Brianna

McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Hair Composition I

2017, Kanekalon hair, yarn, 18 x 6 x 3 in

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Brianna

McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Visibility Is a Trap - Living on the Edge of a Bell Curve

2016, Kanekalon hair, yarn, metal hair clips, steel rod, 10 x 3 x 10 ft

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Brianna

McIntyre

Women & Their Work

Continuity Chair

2017, Mixed media: clothing, wire, burlap, pinewood, 28 x 30 x 28 in

$
0
No items found.
No items found.
Brianna McIntyre

About the Artist

Brianna McIntyre is an artist and designer newly based in Austin, TX. Her creative practice focuses on crafting objects and ephemera that communicate narratives of duality, precariousness, and her experiences as a Black woman. One of her goals as a maker is to take materials out of their comfort zone in order to push their structural qualities and intended use. She is interested in investigating political and social identities through the use of clothing, furniture, and found objects as construction materials. She received her BFA in Furniture Design and Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Artist Statement

My name is Brianna McIntyre and I am a recent Chicago transplant living in Austin proper. I received my BFA in Furniture Design and Fiber and Material studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2017. My creative practice focuses on creating objects and ephemera that communicate narratives of duality, precariousness, and my experiences as a Black woman. Primarily, I use woodworking techniques like wood bending to create fluid and organic shapes that exude a floating (airy) quality. I like to take objects out of their comfort zone and push their structural qualities. With rigid materials, I like to make them fluid, with soft materials, I like to make them structural. Another important component of my practice is the use of found materials, particularly textile waste. My inclusion of these materials is a direct reference to the places, people, and labor associated with that textile or found object. As a woman of color, I use my art to provide a voice for a majority women workforce whose labor, like the environment, is often exploited. It is a constant reminder that craft in the hands of women is often undervalued and under appreciated. I like to layer charged objects within my projects to complicate the narrative and the material read.