Virtual Only
Studio #
255

1914 Willow St

Forrest Aderholt, C/C x WILLOW Gallery

Painting
Don't Kiss Laying Down
Don't Kiss Laying Down

2019, Oil on canvas, 31 1/2 x 44 1/4 in.

$475

NFS

2019, Oil on canvas, 31 1/2 x 44 1/4 in.
Don't Kiss Laying Down

2019, Oil on canvas, 31 1/2 x 44 1/4 in.

$ 475.00 USD

NFS

Freedoms Taken
Freedoms Taken

2019, Acrylic on emergency blanket, 34 1/4 x 61 1/2 in.

0

Available in-studio and in online shop

Baby's First Time With Painted Nails at Church Camp
Baby's First Time With Painted Nails at Church Camp

2021, Oil on unstretched canvas, 48 x 72 in.

$875

Available in-studio and in online shop

Can You Spot the Difference?
Can You Spot the Difference?

2019, Oil on paper, 30 x 22 1/2 in.

$245

Available in-studio and in online shop

Bathers 2020
Bathers 2020

2020, Oil on unstretched canvas, 18 1/2 x 25 1/4 in.

$275

Available in-studio and in online shop

Bathers 2020
Bathers 2020

2020, Oil on unstretched canvas, 18 1/2 x 25 1/4 in.

$275

Available in-studio and in online shop

Don't Kiss Laying Down
Don't Kiss Laying Down

2019, Oil on canvas, 31 1/2 x 44 1/4 in.

$475

Available in-studio and in online shop

No items found.
Forrest Aderholt, C/C x WILLOW Gallery

About the Artist

Forrest Aderholt is an artist living and working in Austin, Texas. His work is most often painting, textile works, or prints. Much of his work mines his childhood memories in order to explore how early upbringings connect to larger systems of power.

Artist Statement

Themes of memory and childhood are ever present in my work. The work is created largely from memory, in an expressionistic almost childlike manner to harken back to childhood memories and is often presented in a similar manner to the tapestries I remember seeing in The Southern Baptist Church. The work often directly takes specific memories of stories, lessons, or images from my childhood. I explore how these lessons or images have shaped my perceptions (or past perceptions) and why these specific memories have stuck with me. For example, “Do you think OJ did it?” is a memory of a story told by a pastor that on the one hand displayed the racist attitudes of the church but is complicated by the fact that the pastor himself unlearns one stereotype in the story. Memories such as this illuminate that the religious, personal, and all aspects of life are inseparable from the political. By exploring themes such as ties between conservative white American Christianity and capitalism in “ Oh Thank Heaven” my own personal memories are being tied into larger systems of white patriarchal coloniality. Through documenting the effects of my own upbringing in a culture focused on exclusion and the white patriarchy I suggest that we all have a complicated relationship with coloniality that has structured all aspects of life. By unpacking my own childhood I am investigating how we are all indoctrinated into modes of oppression from the moment we are born.

forrestaderholt.com
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