Jamie Wade

Exponential Art

Sculptor
exponentialart@hotmail.comvesselsforthesoul.com
Jamie Wade

Jamie

Wade

Exponential Art

Don Prickles

2020, High-fire ceramic with Kanthal wire, 2.75 x 2.5 x 3 in

$
0

Jamie

Wade

Exponential Art

Thornicus

2019, Wood-fired stoneware, 18 x 12 x 10 in

$
1500

Jamie

Wade

Exponential Art

Desire

2020, Soda-fired stoneware, 9 x 7.5 x 7 in

$
425

Jamie

Wade

Exponential Art

Sweet Tendrils

2020, Color photography, 8 x 10 in

$
25

Jamie

Wade

Exponential Art

Fertility

2019, Wood-fired stoneware, 2.5 x 3.5 x 2 in

$
0

Jamie

Wade

Exponential Art

Grinning Blumitous

2019, Wood-fired Stoneware, 18 x 11.5 x 10 in

$
0
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Jamie Wade

About the Artist

Jamie Lea Wade was born and raised on the east coast, where she attended an Art-based High School Magnet Program. After earning her BFA in Ceramics from the Kansas City Art Institute, Jamie followed her heart to Central Texas.

Both artists and curators independently, she and her husband Jess joined forces to start Exponential Art in 2011. Together they have shared studios at the Canopy (Big Medium) and the Eye of the Dog Art Center all this time. They also both have work in a number of public and private collections, including at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts.

Jamie Wade has artworks published in multiple Lark books and Lark Ceramics books including "500 Tiles", "500 Figures in Clay, Volume 2", and "Ceramic Sculpture MAKING FACES: A Guide to Modeling the Head & Face with Clay".

Artist Statement

Jamie Lea Wade believes that we are all strange and interesting creatures; wondrously beautiful, with unique strengths, weaknesses, desires and destinies. Her work dreams, investigates, and appreciates what is possible beyond words.

The majority of her works are hand-built wood-fired ceramic sculptures.

Jamie finds clay to be an incredibly versatile media, with the potential to yield infinitely diverse results. She is also drawn to atmospheric firings, as they drive this point home. Even if two pieces seem to look just alike going into the kiln, they typically come out with their own unique personalities. While this work often requires very labor intensive practices and processes, the seemingly endless possibilities keep it interesting.