Virtual Only
Studio #

Jess Bugg

Multidisciplinary
Ocean No. 2
Ocean No. 2

2021, Mixed media, acrylic, natural pigments on canvas, 31 x 24 in.

$700

NFS

2021, Mixed media, acrylic, natural pigments on canvas, 31 x 24 in.
Ocean No. 2

2021, Mixed media, acrylic, natural pigments on canvas, 31 x 24 in.

$ 700.00 USD

NFS

Mountains No. 2
Mountains No. 2

2021, Acrylic on canvas, 34 x 23 in.

$600

Available in-studio and in online shop

Vernal Pool
Vernal Pool

2021, Acrylic on canvas32 x 30 in.

$600

Available in-studio and in online shop

Glacier No.1
Glacier No.1

2021, Acrylic on canvas, 32 x 22 in.

$900

Available in-studio and in online shop

Dusk
Dusk

2021Acrylic on canvas31 x 22 in.

$600

Available in-studio and in online shop

Rushing Water
Rushing Water

2021, Mixed media, acrylic, charcoal, immitation gold leaf on canvas, 34 x 33 in.

$1,200

Available in-studio and in online shop

Ocean No. 2
Ocean No. 2

2021, Mixed media, acrylic, natural pigments on canvas, 31 x 24 in.

$700

Available in-studio and in online shop

Jess Bugg

Pre-recorded

Studio Visit

Studio Visit

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A quick pre-recorded tour of my studio

ADA accessibility

No ADA accessibility

By appointment only

Jess Bugg

About the Artist

Jess Bugg is a multidisciplinary artist and naturalist based in Austin, TX. She blends her passion for wildlife conservation with a love of visual art and storytelling. She graduated summa cum laude from The Savannah College of Art and Design. Her BA is in Visual Communication with a concentration in Photography and Art History. Jess is currently earning her masters in Nature-Culture-Sustainability-Studies at RISD. Her areas of study include the climate crisis, ecological grief, speciesism and the relationship between art and environmental activism.

Artist Statement

My current work is an exploration of ecological grief and the isolation associated with life in the Anthropocene. Grief is an expected aspect of life, it’s part of living a life that ends. It’s necessary to grieve, without it, we would not know gratitude. Grieving the loss of the natural world is harder to define, how do we as human beings grieve what we are in the midst of losing? How do we grieve what we so deeply depend on for life and that which is ingrained in our DNA? How do we grieve what we (as humans) are causing? And how can we move past feelings of helplessness and turn our grief into gratitude, a form of stewardship that expresses our loss while celebrating what is still here? Empty, abstract landscapes focus on the earth without us, reimagining the natural landscape as the central focus rather than a resource for human consumption. In addition to acrylic paint, experimentation with pigments created from soil, ash, tea, and stone give the pieces a sense of collaboration with the environment and represent the possible reciprocal relationship between human beings and the earth. By focusing on natural world, I hope to create space for meditation and grief as well as inspire environmental stewardship.

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