Lee Edwards

Lee

Edwards

Chained

2020, Wood and chain, 18 x 18 x 18 in

$
2000

Lee

Edwards

Cowboy

2019, Mixed media, 12 x 8 in

$
850

Lee

Edwards

Sprocket

2019, Wood, 30 x 28 x 18 in

$
2000

Lee

Edwards

Squeezed

2020, Wood and rope, 18 x 18 x 18 in

$
2000

Lee

Edwards

Two Balls Long Chain

2020, Wood and steel, 24 x 24 x 24 in

$
2000

Lee

Edwards

Wooden Fruit

2019, Wood and steel, 36 x 28 x 28 in

$
2000
No items found.
No items found.
Lee Edwards

About the Artist

Lee T Edwards is a licensed psychologist in Austin. He has been painting and sculpting since the 1990's. Most of his sculpture is made from scavenged wood and metal. Much of his 2-D work is collage but he also works with acrylic and found materials. His work is largely influenced by mid-century modern American and Latin American artists. He has exhibited his work at the Wally Workman Gallery, the Martin Museum of Art at Baylor University, and the People's Gallery at City Hall. He has work in both private and public collections.

Artist Statement

I have always drawn, ever since I was a child. Making art is part of my heritage; my grandmother was a well-known Ecuadorian sculptor. But in college and graduate school I studied psychology. Around 1990, I taught myself to sculpt and paint by following the styles of classic modernists and Ecuadorean artists. Using a brush and palette knife, I made thickly painted, figurative two-dimensional works. With wood and chisel I experimented with sculpture. Sometime around 2000, I began to discover artists like Jasper Johns, Joseph Cornell, Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, among others. I developed a fondness for sculptures and collages culled from scraps and found materials. My most creative moments emerge from interactions with materials. Ideas seem to bounce from the shapes, textures, and colors of the aged and found items I prefer. Ecology has become an important facet of my work. I like to think of using found or "at hand" materials as creative recycling, with the subtext that there is beauty and usefulness to be found in almost any object or material. I find works of blended media to be especially lively. There is a synergy in such work that invites the eye to dance from facet to facet, texture to color, shape to material, detail to gestalt, and so on. The dancing eye mimics the activity of REM sleep, an active mental state in which the dreamer (viewer) experiences a stream of thoughts and feelings. I would like the viewing experience to emulate that state, to be a resonant emotional encounter, with any attendant meaning or interpretation emerging spontaneously.