Virtual Only
Studio #
444

1112 E 9th St

Makenna Hatter-Paxton

Painting
Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 4)
Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 4)

2021, Charcoal on paper, 11 x 14 in.

$600

NFS

2021, Charcoal on paper, 11 x 14 in.
Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 4)

2021, Charcoal on paper, 11 x 14 in.

$ 600.00 USD

NFS

Body Conflict
Body Conflict

2020, Acrylic on panel, 36 x 24 in.

0

Available in-studio and in online shop

Establishing My Place in Their Pecking Order
Establishing My Place in Their Pecking Order

2020, Acrylic on panel, 30 x 24 in.

0

Available in-studio and in online shop

Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 2)
Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 2)

2021, Charcoal on paper, 12 x 9 in.

$400

Available in-studio and in online shop

Pretend Farmers
Pretend Farmers

2021, Acrylic and oil on panel, 45 x 30 in.

0

Available in-studio and in online shop

One Man And His Dog
One Man And His Dog

2021, Acrylic and oil on panel, 48 x 36 in.

0

Available in-studio and in online shop

Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 4)
Untitled (Charcoal Figure Drawing 4)

2021, Charcoal on paper, 11 x 14 in.

$600

Available in-studio and in online shop

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Makenna Hatter-Paxton

About the Artist

Makenna Hatter-Paxton (she/her) has called Austin home since 1987. She began drawing and painting in 2017 after leaving a 12 year career in the legal field. She is particularly interested in painting the human figure, and she continually looks to artists like Lucian Freud and Edward Hopper for inspiration. Her real-life inspirations include her painting mentor, Shawn Camp, her painting professor, Tommy Fitzpatrick, and her fellow artist and friend, Alexis Hunter. In May 2021 she will graduate with her BFA, concentration in painting, from Texas State University. Apart from painting, she manages a native habitat restoration project on her ranch in South Austin, (Pretty Pool Ranchette) and she is studying to become a beekeeper. One dog and seven chickens call her "Mom."

Artist Statement

I feel compelled to depict people in my paintings and drawings. I see it as a golden opportunity to represent human experiences and emotions that a viewer can relate to. I want viewers to paint along with me - I lay marks down, and then I do not destroy their integrity. Evidence of my hand remains in my paintings so that the viewer has a road map of what I did.My painting practice is governed heavily by questions, such as: what are the implications of using red in someone's dress? Or using blue in flesh? Or green? What am I implying by painting a furrowed brow? How can I paint a face so that their emotional state remains ambiguous? What am I implying by painting a green sky? And then there is this question, which is the one I ask myself the most: what's more important in a painting? What's depicted - or - how the paint was handled? I am starting to believe that my relationship with the paint, and the way I manipulate it, is as important, (or sometimes more important) than what I am actually depicting.

makennahatterdesign.com
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